Derrival

Photo credit Jayme Anne Photography

Photo credit Jayme Anne Photography

Vancouver, BC

Vancouver band Derrival's members have been playing music together for five years, and working seriously together as a band for two. Having just returned from their first Western Canadian tour, we sat down and talked with Derrival before their homecoming show at the Biltmore Cabaret. We asked them all about their tour, promotion process, album plans, and what they like in an audience. This is a band that has some serious energy when they perform, and the talent to go with it.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Derrival

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Derrival

Music: http://derrival.bandcamp.com/


G: How did Derrival get started?

Adam: Deven and I met in grade six, and later on I met Dan through high-school. I met Glen through Deven, and Shane through Glen. It sounds complicated, but that's initially how we all met. We've been playing music for about five years together now, but we were only playing really seriously and performing for two years.

G: Tell us a bit about your album releases, and how their reception has been.

Adam: First we released a seven inch called The Autumn Game/Modern Age Kids and that was what started us getting attention and getting reviews from some of the local magazines. The album got positive reception. Afterwards we spent some time recording at a few different places: Nimbus Recording, and Echoplant Sound where we met our current producer, Ryan Worsley. Ryan produced our last EP Youth Captured. We also just released a new single called Original Script and we've also been getting good reception with that.

G: Are there any plans for a new album?

Adam: We are in the rough stages. We've recorded two singles, Original Script is the first of the two that we plan on releasing in the next couple months. Hopefully we can get some funding for a full length album this summer.

G: Could you tell us a bit about your creative process?

Adam: A lot of the time I'll write lyrics, or Dan will, and we'll come up with a chord progression to it. Or, sometimes Dan will come up with a beat and make a song to it. That's sort of the traditional way to do it, but we are really collaborative and I wouldn't say there is a sole song-writer in this group, everyone contributes.

G: What is your promotional process like? What challenges have you encountered in promotions?

Daniel: For our promotions, I've actually been going to school for public relations at Kwantlen. I've been doing a lot of studying on ways to make a company, organization, or band famous. Lately I've been putting pen to paper and trying my hand at news releases. I did that for the first time a month ago, right before our tour, and we got some good responses from that method. We've also been pretty lucky as far as publications grasping onto us and wanting to share our information. Glen's currently working on finding different ways to get more attention over social media platforms, like Facebook and Twitter, and he's been really on top of that lately.

G: Where did your tour go through?

Glen: Vancouver to Calgary and back. It was kind of unconventional because we had sponsorship from hotels so we were staying at some of the most beautiful places that I’ve ever seen in my life.

G: Do you have a favourite memory from your tour?

Glen: My favourite memory was definitely when we got fed the best tacos we've ever had in our lives from the guy who did solo tap dancing at the Olympic opening ceremonies. He is such a cool guy. He runs a Mexican restaurant in Coleman, Alberta of all places, and he had so much wisdom and advice for us.

G: Did you get a good turn out at the shows during the tour?

Shane: Social media really helped. People would post about our shows to their social media and then a ton of their friends would come out to the shows, it was great.

G: Lets talk about audiences. What makes a good audience, and do you prefer to play at large or small venues?

Deven: Each one has their perks. Big audiences are a lot of fun if everyone is really into the music, and they give a cool energy to the room. But, smaller ones are cool in terms of making personal connections with people. I can't say which we prefer, but there are benefits to both. It's nice to have good energy and intimacy.

G: What do you want audiences to get out of your music?

Adam: I think, lyrically, a lot of what I write about is things I am going through, relationships and things like that which everyone goes through. I think on that aspect I want the audience to connect with me lyrically. We want to inspire people as well. For example, we played a show in Kelowna during the tour and two guys came up to us after and said they were so inspired by the show that they wanted to start their own band. It was cool. Anything to inspire people to play more music and do their own stuff is absolutely fantastic, and we can't really hope for anything better than that.

G: What are your goals for the next year? And, have you achieved any of your original goals already?

Daniel: As far as current goals go, we just submitted our application to the Peak Performance Project and we're really hoping we get into that because it's an amazing process for artists to go through. Also, The Shore has a monthly event they do where they provide an artist ten grand, so we're really hoping that between those two events we'll find the means to create an album. As far as achieved goals, we've just come off our first tour and had a really great time. We would like to do another tour sometime in the future.

G: Can you talk a bit about how you find the Canadian music scene? Is it pretty receptive to your music?

Adam: It's kind of weird because a lot of Canadian bands are so well known in Canada, like Said the Whale, and they'll play a show in Vancouver and it will be sold-out every time. But, they were talking about how when they went to the states there would be far fewer people at their shows. So, internationally things can be tough. The Canadian music scene is really great, especially here in Vancouver where there's so much collaboration and support. It seems like the musicians are sort of friends, and that's really nice because you don't get that everywhere. So, we definitely love the Vancouver music scene.

G: Any last words?

Daniel: Something we've all been discussing lately, especially after the tour, is that we are so thankful for the fans we have and the support we get from people. Nothing could happen for us without everyone's support. We want to make it clear that we just can't be thankful enough.